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without a "can't lose" attitude. we'll meet a high school [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. stopping may increase your risk of having a st
] this is bob, a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doct
not. ♪ a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the
't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. >>> for weeks everybody's talked about the looming fiscal cliff like it's all important, like nothing else matters. but you know what's really important, too? corporate earnings. and we've been getting some pretty swell corporate earnings for this week. take jbl. when other companies outsource their operations, they go to jabil. this is a company that has its fingers in a lot of different cookie jars. they reported last night and the numbers are fabulous. they had a 5 percent earnings increase. the stock rose 7.4%, made jabil one of the largest movers. that's why i'm glad to have here mr. main. it was the most bullish in this conference call that i've heard you in i'd say eigh
, the stock would be lower and i question the dividend. i don't like darden on a bounce. exit. bob in connecticut, please, bob? >> caller: yes, jim. first of all, let me say boo-yah from connecticut. and, you know, a few months ago i bought a keurig coffee machine. i was so impressed, i bought the stock, which was green mountain, i paid $57 for it. my question to you is, since it's gone down so much, started to come back up, should i hold on to it? >> i'm not -- i happen to be a fan of the keurig too, but unlike victor and the old ad, he was such a fan of realmington, he bought the company. i don't want to by green mountain. it's got the red flag, the red flag of my friend herb greenberg, and when he raises issues, i don't go there. herb tells me where battlegrounds are, and when it comes to a battleground, i'd rather eat a cold corn dog. well, check that. >>> i like to revisit stocks i talk about on "mad money," and in this case like hillshire, i think it needs more time, this is a long-term turn-around story. i suggest getting it on weakness, listen, this tastes better than the d
, bob. we did. got it. >>> if you notice unusual trades happening today, it might be because of those gentlemen. >> and ladies. >> they'll ring the opening bell. >> we'll tell you more about that in a couple of minutes. in the meantime -- >> they are gentlemen. >> in the meantime, the president is in hawaii on vacation. washington lawmakers are on holiday. there's still no deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. the deadline is a week away. hampton pearson is in washington on the stalemate. >> as early as the day after christmas, congress and the white house will have to start to deal with what president obama called the real consequences of going over that fiscal cliff. >> nobody can get 100% of what they want. and this is not simply a contest between parties in terms of who looks good and who doesn't. there are real world consequences to what we do here. >> a short-term deal won't just focus on tax rates. the end of the payroll tax cut and the impact of the hike in the minimum tax on january 1st. over the weekend, we did hear from some republican moderates who say it may in fact be time to
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. time to wake up, everyone, as you take a live look at new york city. welcome back to "morning joe." back with us on set we have donny deutsch, mark mckinnon, and richard haass. >> let's start -- there's so much to talk about but, richard, let's start in egypt. absolutely fascinating. i think a lot of people across the world were so heartened by the democratic, we thought, perhaps uprising that was going on in egypt. certainly we all knew to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally, and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majorityism. people like morsi win elections but winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern. the question is whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he di
, he was horrible in debates. >> no, you had to hold your breath all the time. >> and then bob dole, you had to hold your breath. and george w., good old guy, but that guy had trouble with the english language. >> you're going up against bubba. the best on the planet. >> it would be nice to have somebody -- >> no, that's why it was so sad when people like mitch daniels and haley didn't go in this time because they sound like churchill compared. >> guess who i just got an e-mail from? alexandra liebenthal. how exciting. julia, stay with us. >> jean just e-mailed me. >> you're a bad man. i mean, you really are. >> bad to the bone. >> we should do a segment. >> yeah. >> like the conversation we had at the dinner table. and you all have to listen. >> i have no idea what you're talking about. you wrote this past month. did you make your deadline? >> you know, again -- >> david. >> we love david. >> we love david. >> the magazine's awesome. it came with an ax. >> oh. >> i bought it for my mom for christmas. >> that was sweet. >> she'll use it. >> chop up. >> you have no idea. >> actionabl
interesting conversations over the weekend was bob corker saying, let's just go ahead, concede to the tax argument, which would flip the entire spotlight onto entitlements, which is what republicans have been trying to get the discussion to be about over the last couple of weeks. >> when you hear about entitlements, why aren't they talking directly, you know, medicare part b koshcosts x, or medicare a, should cost this. the last thing a republican wants to do is say, look, i'm cutting back medicare. so, i mean, if you switch it to entitlements, suddenly everyone has to say, social security goes from 66 to 68. is that what we do? do we means test medicare? it is so much easier for grover who will be on cnbc, forget the fiscal cliff, i will come after you with both barrels. if you vote tax increase. what's more -- do they want to rise above a tax increase? no. do they want to rise above fiscal cliff? no. what they want it do is not rise above the radar screen of raising taxes. and grover is more powerful than a recession. i asked him point-blank on "meet the press," college chum, look, it d
, everybody, the best thing to watch this month, and bob pisani pointed this out. the transportation stocks have been very strong. china has been strong. mandy, you know, japan has been strong, and the banks have been strong. to me there's an underlying strength to the market when some of the bodyguards have been doing well so i think the market wants to do better. that having been said the fiscal cliff will turn out to be not a maxi deal but a mini deal and will clip the economy not by 1% but a 2% and a 60% chance something will get done but that's where we come out on it right now. a little bit harder hit to the economy. >> don't adjust your sets, everybody. this is what bob sounds like today. >> this is a different exchange here. >> not doing your imitation of david? >> what do you think that the seasonal factors are a major reason why the markets are holding up so well? if you look at the havens, gold, treasuries, for example, the dollar, there's no sign of panic in the haven. >> silver is down. you've seen a little bit of a lift in the vix, closer to 20. that's not bad, a normalization
up from there. and bob corker the senator from tennessee who was also on "meet the press" yesterday has proposed some legislation that instead cuts $641 million out of medicare. we'll see some scale up in that direction. there are some things that republicans could like in that initial bid. >> let me bring in congresswoman karen bass. so you're hearing all the sides going back and forth but the one thing that everybody seems to just about agree on is that we're not getting anywhere fast. lindsey graham says we're going over the cliff among others. what do you think? >> i don't believe we'll go over the cliff. i do think people are drawing a line in the sand which is a typical part of negotiation like your previous speakers said. i think that everybody understands the consequences, that the president has put forward a plan that would reduce taxes, or maintain the tax cuts for 98% of the u.s. public. and so i don't believe that my republican colleagues want to see taxes go up on 100% but they do need to come to table and counter the proposal. if they want changes and entitlements they
even beyond their wildest dreams. abc's bob woodruff has the story. >> reporter: 32-year-old gabriel posey, a staff sergeant in the army, just returned from the sands of afghanistan. but now here, in los angeles, he's about to get a huge surprise. what he knows is that he's been matched up with a mentor to help him get a start in the field he's dreamed about much of his life, screen writing. what he doesn't know is that his mentor is one of the biggest names in hollywood. >> your brothers were killed in combat. >> this is one of the great things about people in the military, they're good at solving problems. those people are worth their weight in precious metals. >> what will be the number one thing you'll tell him about getting into the film industry? >> okay. you have got to say i know who i am, i know what my kills are, and i'm in this for the long haul. perseverance. it all comes down to that. >> reporter: i told gabriel his mentor wasn't well known. just someone with connections. i lied. i'm going to show you who this is. i think you'll be very happy. >> oh! wow! no way. i love
: it was voted down three consecutive times. host: here's an e-mail from bob and florida. making the economic argument against right-to-work state. and then there are people who have an economic argument on the other side of it. if we read a piece earlier in the washington post on what right-to-work states due to the broader economy. -- due to the state's economy? and now this isn't egypt. on the front page of the washington post, amid this turmoil, aid for egypt is on its way. the u.s. and a coalition of international lenders are pushing ahead with billions of dollars of loans and other help for egypt and neighboring states. so, money going to the country despite the violence there. and on the domestic front, the richmond times dispatch, courtesy of the newseum, health care law includes from a surprising $60 coverage free. bob in rapid city, south dakota, republican caller. caller: whee are a right-to- work state. in the past week we had an article in the newspaper that we are 16th in the nation in income. we averaged 44,000. where is the nation averages 41,000. so it's just not true that a
's a question, though, willie, whether you want the job or not. >> right. >> i asked bob riley, i've said this 1,000 times, it seems extraordinarily important if you're a union member in the northeast, and like me, you want your factories running again. i asked bob riley, i don't understand, why did mercedes go to tuscaloosa county, alabama, instead of filling up the factories in connecticut? 15 minutes away from yale. or in rhode island. 20 minutes away from brown. i mean, right by some of the most highly trained, brilliant minds in the world. that's easy. the work force rules are so insane there, there's no way that mercedes or bmw or airbus would ever dream of going to those states. do you want the jobs or do you not want the jobs? >> and that plays out all over the south in harold's home state of tennessee, auto plant comes back, you get a bunch of jobs but at a very low wage. so the question is do you want to lower ourselves to the global standard of wages so that you have many more jobs -- >> that's a better option. >> that question has to be answered -- >> stronger middle class in union s
to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will bring you a portion of the morning portion of the discussion at the foundation for defense of democracy. this segment and this panel discussion focused on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that
? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking advair. if you're still having difficulty breathing, ask your doctor if including advair could help improve your lung function. get your first full prescription free and save on refills at advaircopd.com. >>> we knew the gop brand was in shamblingb shamblingble, but now we have proof. a new nbc wall street journal poll shows the party favorability ratings is at 30%. close to a 10-year low. well, i'v
the tremendous service and career of bob morton. a 22-year veteran of the washington state legislature who recently announced that he was going to be retiring at the end of the year. he was first elected to the house in 1990 and then he was appointed to the senate where he currently represents the seventh district, including stevens, and parts of spokane county. he owned a small logging business and ran cattle while also preaching at his local church and serving the community. but bob is not just an outstanding legislator for eastern washington, he's also a close friend. a mentor and the reason that i got into politics and public service in the first place. as an elected official i've worked with him on countless issues and his advice and friendship has been invaluable. he's recognized for his leadership and knowledge, good forest management, no one knows western water law better than bob and he's participated in most of the negotiations over washington water law. bob and his wife linda have five children, 11 grandchildren and i know they're looking forward to spending more time with them
we are. okay? it's the end of the week. we're going in to new year's and what do we have? bob corker got up today, senator, republican, senior guy now on this issue. and what does he say? we may not get a deal and we're going to threaten the good faith and credit of the united states again. okay? 514 days and what do we get? more debt ceiling threats and the irony is you talk about the pressure but the irony is republican base on wall street thinks that's a terrible idea. so what does the president have to do? something that's uncomfortable for him because he's more responsible than these guys and say i care so much about a deal to negotiate with myself. i'm going to give it up and still threatening me and i think he has to take an maxim from donald rumsfeld, weakness is provocative. tell them we're strong, the white house, we were re-elected. you go home. you go home and deal with it because this is out of control and nobody's angry enough to realize it. >> you're angry enough. >> i'm alone. >> no, you're not. >> michael shear's not angry. he's measured and i understand that and we'
. if i lived in brazil. bob's is one of the most poplar fast-food joints in the country is now serving up burgers with edible wrappers. the ad campaigns claim the customers want the food so badly they can't wait to unwrap it. here to chew through all the details including the wrapper, my favorite branding expert bruts turk kel. thanks for coming back to the show. >> sure. melissa: is this marketing genius? they shof the whole burger in their mouth because it is delicious? >> from a mark the asking point of view, the burger is so good. they can't wait. they have to tear into it. that is kind of like wearing crocs because you don't want to take your shoes off to take a shower. i'm not sure people will buy that but another thing to think about. 17% of the fast-food in the country is in cars. why they have french toast sticks and burger bites and clicken tend ders. the big messy burgers like the one you like you can't eat in the car. if they can wrap them up take them in the car, those are suvs for fast-food companies. that is where they make the money. melissa: i hear you on that point. it m
. senator bob corker is asking for specifics regarding the trillion in cuts that the president referred to on meet the press. and covering that from benghazi and on and on. >> and in your brew with david gregory you offered over one trillion and agreement with congress and avert the fiscal cliff. you are silent on the specifics. wrestling with the national's crisis help us to have a concrete plan and legislative language with you. >> it was interesting, very wide raging . there were not opportunities and he didn't get specifics when he talked about all of the things he's offered. at one point i offered so many changes and entitlements? i askscatched my head and wondered what changes and entitlements. he said the democrats arangry at me. i said what are the specifics. that was a interesting level. >> dave: he put in the corner and said only thing they care about is creating tax cuts for the wettley. demonize the opponent while you sate sit down. that works out it infuriate your opponent. the president's main goal is to raise taxings. put out legislation and put out a bill and vote on it
that wasn't a fun time. >> not like in a room having a cocktail. >> dave: how about republican bob corker who talked to greta about the spending cuts that they would like to see from the democrats thus far not on the table. it's a shame in this nation where every developed country in the world knows our fiscal cliff is our fiscal solvency you have to have these leverage points. sit down and solve the problem because we know it's our greatest threat. that's not the case here. we have a president who has not laid out a plan. is he on yulingsly a spendaholic. >> dave: here is the problem for republicans though. if there is no deal out of the senate he will say okay i need an up or down vote on the $250,000 up or down mark. if republicans want to go on record to say no on that. that's going to be very politically dangerous for john boehner in the house. that's the bottom line. >> juliet: i know you are getting a lot of tweets. mine is like i blame, this i blame that guy. it's interesting to hear what you guys have to say about that first, let's go to peter doocy. what happens this weekend as
, bob. we should let our viewers know, they might recognize you, you were on "fox & friends" three times in the past couple of years. >> three times. >> alisyn: when you were talking about work to help vets you didn't share were you in the middle of a crisis. take us back to three years ago, were you in china and your wife called. christy called and said there had been an accident and first didn't think it would be that bad and word came in that it was very serious. and we arranged a series of conference calls with the doctors and at one point, the doctor said to me, i asked her, how, what she thought was going to happen she couldn't tell, she couldn't guarantee he would live another 15 minutes. at that point i asked both of my brothers to find a catholic priest to give bobby the last rites. >> alisyn: bobby, do you remember the accident? >> no, i don't. no recollection at all. >> alisyn: what's the first thing that you remember afterwards? >> first thing i remember afterwards was waking up in the hospital. >> alisyn: and of course, shocked that you knew that your life was forever change
policy institute. we have bob packwood from oregon, the former chairman of the senate finance committee. we hope to get your thoughts. the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have about an hour to an hour half.fa i would direct the conversation as best i can. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this debate, and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path and incorporate changes in tax policy to get there. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table, and like all your thoughts, they need some ideas. both sides need this to bridge this gap because right now we appear to be a stalemate. i will turn it over to john podesta to get your thoughts. knowing that john has to live, and the center for american progress has come up with ideas, and, john, maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those, and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, following up on this morning's session, in order that a balanced approach, w
in the party and certainly from the right. >> reporter: no doubt about it. bob corker from tennessee was on "fox news sunday" yesterday. he gave fo voice to something you're hearing from an increasing number of republicans right now which is maybe they should give in on raising taxes on the rich in order to fight it out and try to get more leverage in terms of spending cuts. take a listen. >> once you give him the rate on the top 2%, it's actually a much lesser tax increase than what's he's been talking about. the focus then shifts to entitlements. >> reporter: now, the key, though, as we've all been talking about this end of the year deadline, december 31st, but in fact, when you talk to leaders in both parties, they realize the real deadline is probably the end of this week in terms of at least getting a framework of a deal so that then both the house expht senat and e can work on the details and pass this thing. they've got to get moving now, this week, if they're going to get this done by the end of the year. >> shepard: ed, thank you. the president commented today on the battle
richman; and republican senator bob corker. gwen ifill has our next installment. >> ifill: a senior democrat on the house banking committee and the vice chair of the centrist new democrat coalition. welcome, congresswoman. we heard earlier today from john boehner and from jay carney at the white house, one saying spending cuts aren't serious coming from the house and the other saying the white house has put forth all the spending cuts that need to be put out. how do you prioritize what should be the focus here: spending cuts or raising revenue? >> most of us know it's got to be both. the fact is the president put out a really very sensible plan, middle-ground where it actually included spending cuts. we've already done a trillion dollars and we'll be doing another trillion dollars over a trillion dollars in cuts. that's $2 trillion. that's serious spending cuts over and above what we've done already. and of course we do think there has to be some revenue. then we're going to make sure we're doing the right kind of investments so we see economic growth. if it's not all three we're no
the president is hopeful a fiscal cliff you will get done in time, mayor bob buckhorn is concerned at how higher taxes will affect the tourism throughout the state. this has an interesting twist. we know that local mayors across the country are worried about the fiscal cliff deal. i think this is one that not a lot of people are talking about. >> melissa, what i do think is if this tax bill is not passed and middle-class folks do not get sick -- do not get the tax exemptions that they normally get, my concern is not raising taxes on the 2% and it is even much less. the 98% of the people who need those middle-class taxes extended are the people that i represent and those of the people traveling to florida for vacation. melissa: i hear you, but you represent and that of those other folks also. there are a lot of wealthy people that live in the tampa bay area and in gorgeous homes on the gulf coast area. you are real estate market has been among those of the most deep rust. why would you want to raise taxes on your wealthy citizens either? >> i think it is a fairness issue. it is a moral issue. the
that will be calculated, and quite frankly, in a more simplified form been standard tax law. host: professor bob kelly? guest: when i say chaos i am -- professor buckley? >> when i say chaos, i am referring to two things. the irs has done programming based on their being a patch enacted by the end of the year. most tax returns software has made the same calculated gamble. i agree that the government needs revenue. i do not think there is any question of that. if you just say that the amt is a good tax because it raises revenue, i do not argue on the notion that we need money, however is an extraordinarily arbitrary way of raising revenue. it raises revenue not from the super wealthy. the amt applies to few people making more than half of $1 million. it is counter-intuitive. if you are going to raise revenue, it should be as president obama has suggested, shared sacrifice, and that sacrifice has to come from people making more than half of $1 million. host: how do the very wealthy get out of paying the amt? guest: because of the rate structure. the rate between $200,000 and $500,000 are at least as hig
with their presence. there's usually two or three of them i see. host: moving on to bob in pennsylvania. bob, how long have you been with the n.r.a.? caller: a long time. host: 10-20 years? caller: 15 years. what kind of guns do you own? caller: guns, shotguns, pistols, and i do own an a.r.-15. host: what do you think about mr. lapierre? caller: i was disappointed. i was anxious to hear the news conference and hopeful n.r.a. would come out with a reasonable response and want to lead in the middle. i believe that it's a good idea to have armed edwards in school. -- armed guards in school. the n.r.a. said they would train these people with an unlimited budget. but they stop way short of -- yes, video games and violence in our society, kids playing on these video games and the movies and the music. when i was young, we were not allowed to watch "the untouchables," eliot with robert because my parents thought it was too violent. my parents thought. and now we've come to this. there's no reason these guns should be available for sale. they have no place in the sporting arena or no place in the hunting aren
by reaching hosted by bob casey. senator bob casey of hearing. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, haltin
. the have to find common ground. host: bob is on the line from chapel hill, north carolina. caller: two specific questions. does your trillion dollar increase come from status scoring versus dynamic scoring? there is some growth that comes out of the base broadening. on social security, do you adjust the inflation annually? lastly, a little history. i know the set was trying to do something with the commission in 2008-2009. they fail to pass it. -ba- -- they failed to pass it. the hypocrisy did not go both ways. i think history would help people understand the importance of simpson-bowles. guest: you're absolutely right. there have been several proposals. they are creating a commission that have the authority to come up with a plan. this was a bipartisan bill that was in the senate. it failed. the alternative was the aha president by executive order established simpson-bowles. the leadership in congress soft agreed that if simpson-bowles got 14 members to vote yes then the recommendations would be put up for consideration and some sort of expedited fashion. it became a non issue. the pr
, so many who wanted to speak. but i want to say to you what i said bob wright of autism speech earlier today. i think you for caring about somebody other than your children and ourselves. because what you're doing here today is raising this issue so that other children, other than those that may be in your own family, maybe your friends, will benefit in the future. you're touching the future and you're making it possible for those who are going through the optimism -- the hottest inspector disorders to have a better future. so -- the autism spectrin disorders to have a better future. so i urge you to stay the course. one thing i have learned in 17 years is that, in order for these causes to move forward, you have to keep banging the drum. and you must bang it louder and louder in presenting your case so that, after it is all over, as my mother would say, motion, commotion, emotion and no results. i want you to be successful in what you're doing. life is short. so we must try to use our energy so that we can get the best possible results. i am so glad the chairman said what he said abou
morning. >> host: good morning, bob. >> caller: question. this is a topic that nobody wants to talk about. the interest-rate cut the interest that is paid on the national debt. presently most of our debt is under short term, under 1%. and it's manipulated, of course, by the federal reserve and treasury department. so it's going to go from say 250 billion interest payments up to 7%, the next several years. one half trillion dollars in interest annually on the national debt. wondering, how is that going to impact our military industrial complex in the near future when that actually comes to be? >> that clearly -- the ticking time bomb for any part of the federal government and probably because of. [indiscernible] , the state government. we are in a time of unusually low interest rates. it will continue for a time, but when they rise it is going to be a body blow to the national politics and the country because, as your caller was indicating, the jump from 1% to 7% is such a massive increase in taxes that the only thing i can think of is, can you say greece? >> host: what does it mean for th
we are heading in the same direction. thank you and have a wonderful new year. host: a tear from bob now in the democrat light. caller: thank you for letting me have a chance to speak. i am more optimistic -- i a more pessimistic than optimistic. i just do not think they will ever get together like they should. my one comment is when they start speaking about the cuts and the entitlements, the always a social security, medicare, medicaid. that is not the only entitlements. every government program that has a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here ou
is why we're dealing with the debt ceiling again and we just showed i haved why from bob corker and the senator from tennessee talking and he said we'll get the spending cuts in january when the debt ceiling comes up and if you're progressive, we'll have the big spending cuts conversation, which is medicare, medicaid on the table and some of the tax stuff may have been taken care of. >> we're getting close to the top of the hour and the big three coming up with the best and worst of the week. you'll want to hear this next. ke a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant >> getting close to the top of the hour. back to the big three, for the best week, worst week. perry, i'll start with you, what's your best and worst this week? i picked chuck hagel. he's our defense secretary and he's getting attacked by democrats and republicans very harshly and has no chance to defend himself and for the winner, it's hard to pick a winner right now. washington is not working right now and it's hard to say anyone is doing a great job and this is not a great situation
. subscription service 7.99 a month. television partnerships with nickelodeon, sponge bob square pants. works with set top boxes. give a gift card. works on nintendo wii u brand new. kids consul the nintendo wii you in high definition. game pad. hulu plus and play games on the game pad or on the screen. new nintendo games and moreio games and nintendo land. theme park game from the folks from nintendo i have been testing it. it's a lot of fun. >> about 300 bucks. >> about $300. great for the small kids. get them involved in science. i loved science as a kid. i tykes a couple different programs and items. this is their microscope. put iphone or microphone. it has so it interact. put a tablet. see on the large screen a butterfly or zoom on different specimens play up and down with a real lenz as they look through here. >> mom and dad you buy this it's $89 but you buy your kid an iphone and a tablet. >> if you have it most parents are throwing those things in there they have anyway. with you pick up on amazon dot many arthur wants this for his kid and i do. my kid is a huge thomas fan. all of th
to the mid 30s. bob dole in the midst of the anti-immigrant sentiment of the 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the magic 40% that karl rove thought was the jumping off point for neutralizing all of these questions. so, you know, we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here. so, if you -- you know, a 10% shift in the latino votes moving 1 million to 1.3 million, you know, the actual -- what the turnout is, we don't really know yet. it's going to take a while. the exit poll numbers are losing credibility as time goes on, but that's -- i don't want to get too -- >> yes. >> you know, geeky with you [laughter] a shift to a million voters, million and a half voters, and romney would have been in the mid 30s in terms of his share, and everybody would have said, "that was a pretty good night for a republican." now, what would have happened in terms of actual states, i knew you were going to ask that -- [laughter] >> and then i want to go down the row, getting everyone. >> it's interesting, because it doesn't -- it would have -- i'll leave it to the pundits
other young men, a soldier from kansas named bob dole, and one from michigan named phil hart. they formed a lifelong bond, one that endiewrd all the way to the u.s. senate. in 2003 when we dedicated that
or have differences. but they did keep each other informed. bob dole replaced howard baker as a speaker. dole takes over baker as leader. but they kept baker informed. they just work together and kept each other in touch of what the other was great to do. they still opposed each other at times. they kept no secrets. >> i always like to talk about byrd and baker. they really did epitomize the great senate and the way things worked at that time. the first two chapters of my book are entitled "the grind" and "the natural." he was a most natural politician you could come across. if senators voted based on secret ballot, baker would have won. they had a remarkable capacity for doing that. there is one incident in my book where i describe senator byrd. it is such an unusual act, it he gets the vice president in the chair and by a script that byrd has written, start ruling them out of order in a way that is quite contrary to the way the senate work. there is a rebellion on the senate floor. everyone is going crazy and what robert byrd is doing even though they hate filibusters. one thing that
are pleased to have our distinguished colleagues chuck schumer from new york, bob mendez from new jersey and i believe senator gillibrand will be here shortly. the senators have been a strong partners in this rebuilding effort. it is a great privilege to work together. we are really strong team we share the value of a quick action and sufficient resources to get this job done. as i mentioned, we are in the largest transportation. in the country and it takes diligence and skill of our friends and colleagues. senator schumer. >> thank you, mr. chairman. first, thank you for this hearing but also for your great partnership. new york and new jersey were together as a bipartisan by-date delegation along with our colleagues from rest of the northeast to deal with this awful, awful devastation. it is good you are in so many important positions that will have a lot of say in how we deal with this and we're grateful for that as well as your leadership. thank you, ranking member, senator wicker. west hamilton beach was in my old congressional district. it is one of the few volunteer fire departments in
on unemployment insurance that they're no longer employable at all. host: bob receives unemployment insurance. tell us about your situation. caller: i'm a single-earner, and thank god i have made a good living. assuming i could get a job, and nothing against the folks at fast food or nothing like that, but if you were making a minimum amount of money, with my situation, i would be in the street using that job. i could not pay my bills. i am not talking about luxuries. i rent. i would not be able to pay that. thank god unemployment insurance is geared to what you used to make, so that, and by the way, i am in my 60's. it is not easy. without that amount coming in that is based on what i used to make, i would not be able to survive. i would be industry. -- in the street. host: mr. josh bivens, a chance on this one. guest: that points out that unemployment insurance is a form of social insurance. people take lower wages because the employer has to pay tax. they pay into the system while things are going well, and if they hit a rough spot they hit a benefit that somewhat match its previous earnin
than we do of linking appropriations. host: let's hear from bob in minnesota, republican caller. caller: there is a topic that nobody wants to talk about. it is the interest rate. the interest paid on our national debt. currently, most of the debt is under short term, under 1%. it is manipulated by the federal reserve and the treasury department. it is going to go from a historic -- $1.50 trillion in interest annually on the national debt. how is that going to impact the military industrial complex in the near future when that actually comes to be? guest: that clearly is a ticking time bomb for any part of the federal government. we are in a period of unusually low interest rates. when they rise, it is going to be a body blow to the national politics and the country. the jump from 1% to 7% is such a massive increase in taxes that the only thing i can think of is greece. host: what does it mean for the pentagon? guest: greece used to be one of the only three non-u.s. countries in nato that was spending 2% of gdp on national security. they are now below that because they cannot afford it.
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